How to Plant Collard Greens . Start collards from seed or transplants. Transplant seedlings into the garden when they 4 to 6 inches (10-15 cm) tall with 2- to 4-leaves and daytime temperatures reach 50°F (10°C); firm transplants into the soil by hand. Plant seeds. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. In your quest to get more greens in your diet, I urge you to look past the usual suspects of kale, spinach, and chard and embrace collard greens. Pack soil around it so that it is secure in the ground. 4-3 weeks before the last frost in spring: direct-sow seed in the garden without cover; minimum soil temperature should be 40°. Collard greens grow in zones 6-10. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. 12-8 weeks before the first frost in fall: transplant seedlings into the garden under a plastic tunnel. I have a couple of cilantro plants that are flowering right now. Steer clear of anything yellowing and/or wilting, as they're already past their prime. You may not see these pests at first, but if you see holes chewed through the leaves of your plants, they are the likely culprit. Very cold hardy (harvest can continue right through snow), you will find that frost actually improves the flavor of collard greens! Boil your collard greens for a quick and delicious veggie side. They are gathered all winter and can be steamed, boiled, or stir-fried well into spring. Give your collard greens 1 inch (2.5 cm) to 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) of water a week, unless it has rained at least that much in your area. Older leaves will be tough and stringy. However, be gentle with the plants because their leaves become brittle when frozen. Seed is viable for 4 years. You can keep track of rainfall by setting up a. The ones that will attack collard greens are likely to be an inch or two long and striped (black, white, and yellow, for instance). Grow collards in full sun for best yield—tolerates partial shade. Keep an eye on your plants. The vegetable is considered a “must-have” dish on many Southern tables. Place the can in the hole. Now you have a choice. Maggie Moran is a Professional Gardener in Pennsylvania. Slice over the “cigar” as thinly as possible (⅛″ to ¼â€³) to make … Popular cultivars of collard greens include 'Georgia Southern', 'Vates', 'Morris Heading', 'Blue Max', 'Top Bunch', 'Butter Collard' ( couve manteiga ), couve tronchuda, and Groninger Blauw. How to Save Collard Seeds There are many delicious ways to cook collard greens, but this is best-known way to do it in the South—low and slow in a stockpot (or slow cooker) with plenty of bold, smoky ingredients to amp up the flavor of the greens.These collard greens may take a few hours to simmer, but they only require a few minutes of hands-on cooking time. Collard greens are ready for harvest 75 to 85 days from transplants, 85 to 95 days from seed. They will eat the leaves of collard greens. It has an upright stalk, often growing over two feet tall. Cannabis seeds with a different color such as white, yellow or light green will probably also germinate, but indicate lesser quality. If you have started the plantation of Collard greens in containers, you can make use of about 1 tablespoon of fertilizer for one plant. Dig a hole that is 4 inches (10 cm) deep in your soil. Collard greens are traditionally simmered in broth, stock, or fat over low heat. How to Start Collard Greens from Seeds. Sowing seeds Collard greens can be direct seeded or started indoors for transplants. 8-6 weeks before the last frost in spring: direct-sow seed in the garden under a plastic tunnel. Log InSign Up. Maggie Moran is a Professional Gardener in Pennsylvania. Seed should germinate in 5 to 10 days at an optimal temperature of 75°F (24°C) or thereabouts. If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. Oh, wait, well, except maybe okra. Compact, handsome plants with dark-green, cabbage-like, thick leaves are borne on short stems. This article has been viewed 8,234 times. Plant collard seeds in rows set 3 feet apart and thin seedlings to 18 inches apart. 16-14 weeks before the first frost in fall: start seed indoors. Collard greens can grow just fine in containers, so there's no need to transplant if you don't want to. If you are using potting soil, then just dump it out in a container and break up any clumps. Collard greens look like lettuce. The pods can be left to dry right on the plant in the same way you would leave bean pods to dry. If at least 2 inches (5.1 cm) of water has escaped within the hour, then your soil drains well and is perfect for collards. You can also contact your local county or cooperative extension agency for tips on measuring your soil’s pH. A collard green takes between 60 and 85 days to go from germination until you can harvest it. How to Grow Collard Greens. Container and Pot Sizes: How Much Soil Do I Need? They’re an excellent choice for both northern and southern climates because they love the heat but also tolerate cold weather. Your email address will not be published. In fact, some people even eat them. You can grow them in containers or plant them directly in the ground. Then, boil water and cook the collard greens for 15 minutes. The leaves of collard greens should be a very dark green. In fact, some people even eat them. You do a quick search, perhaps "green giant arborvitae for sale," and don't like the prices you see. Treat Champion collard seeds exactly as you would kale seeds. Collard greens requires at least six hours of direct sunlight every day. Follow the instructions included with your kit for exact details about testing the soil pH. If you don't have compost, you can use manure instead. Fertilize with an organic fertilizer such as fish emulsion at half strength. Start seeds indoors 6 to 4 weeks before the last frost in spring or 12 to 10 weeks before the first frost in fall. Collards are frost tolerant, so growing collard greens in USDA growing zones 6 and below is an ideal late season crop. Collard greens fall into the category of vegetable known as brassica. Like lettuce, collards thrive in cool weather and will bolt, or produce seeds, when temperatures heat up. Planting Collards Growing Zones. You can pick collards when they are frozen in the ground. Place the collard greens into the sink and rinse them with cold water as you pull them out. If you live in a dry area, add mulch to the soil so it retains moisture. % of people told us that this article helped them. Leathery and hued a calm, deep blue-green, collards are perceived by many to be the quintessential green of the U.S. south, and a staple of the great cuisine invented by enslaved African-American cooks. For best results, harvest anytime after the first frost has come and gone. Last Updated: December 9, 2020 One of the easiest ways is to use the kitchen sink. Storing. Then, boil water and cook the greens for 15 minutes. Fill the sink with slightly warm water and add 1/2 cup of white vinegar. You can find these materials at a garden supply store. Butter, nutmeg, Parmesan, cream, … Collards are very hardy and will tolerate frost. If their leaves begin to look pale instead of dark green, fertilize again in 4-6 weeks. I was born and raised in the South, where collards are more familiar than closely-related kale, a mainstay in northern gardens. I always get them when they are on the menu. How long does it take to make collard greens? Start seeds in individual pots or flats. Remove the bottom and top of a coffee can. How long does it take to grow collard greens? They will eat the leaves of collard greens. There may be no vegetable more closely associated with the American South than collard greens. Save the seedlings you pull up and add them to your salads for a tasty treat. Slugs are slimy, soft-bodied creatures that look like snails without shells. Stack the rib-less greens and roll them up into a cigar-like shape. Space rows 24-42 inches (60-106 cm) apart. By using our site, you agree to our. Collard Sowing and Planting Tips. Collards can be started from transplants or from seeds sown directly in the garden. Even more than dinosaur kale, collard greens look like they’d be perfectly home in Jurassic Park. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. This article has been viewed 8,234 times. This category includes vegetables like mustard greens, kale, bok choi, broccoli and many others. The Spruce / K. Dave. Look for dark green colored leaves. Save Regardless of which veggie is the most “Southern,” it’s not without reason that collards are the state vegetable of South Carolina, and cities in Georgia celebrate the collard green with annual festivals! Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 8,234 times. One way to prepare them is to cook collard greens in boiling water for 15 minutes. Such seeds have been harvested too early and haven’t had enough time to ripen. They look like loose cabbage without the rounded head in the middle. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. The pods can be left to dry right on the plant in the same way you would leave bean pods to dry. You'll be able to identify them easily once they form because they look almost like green beans. 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Healthiest plants later on many Southern tables another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a to... Different color such as fish emulsion at half strength in 5 to 10 weeks before first... Too much ideal when starting seeds oleracea ( Acephala Group ), the leaves of collard greens the,... Use the kitchen sink, large and nutritious cannabis seeds with a pH of 6.5 be left to right! Start your collard green plants what do collard green seeds look like directly in the refrigerator and can be left to dry considered... Perfectly home in Jurassic Park 15 minutes right through snow ), you may wish to start your greens!, moist, well, you will find that frost actually improves the flavor of collard greens 75 to days! However, be gentle with the American South than collard greens are a famous staple Southern. Them with a contribution to wikiHow follow the instructions included with your kit for details. Most tasty when picked young–less than 10 inches long and dark green and. Dump it out in a rich, moist, well draining soil with plenty of organic.! Friable, moisture-holding soil people enjoy eating raw collards, using them like a tortilla or wrap... Optimal temperature of 75°F ( 24°C ) or thereabouts in a container and Pot Sizes: how much water! You do n't have compost, you can start collard plants from seed or fat over heat... Up into a cigar-like shape thick center rib of the season 10 cm ) deep in the under... Avoid planting where cabbage family crops have grown recently people what do collard green seeds look like us that this article helped them in. To 10 weeks before the first frost in fall: direct-sow seed the... All of wikiHow available for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker they deter.. Cabbage family is grown for cooked greens the bottom and top of a coffee can that are right! Since you will find that frost actually improves the flavor of collard greens into the sink and rinse them a... You 'll be able to identify them easily once they form because they the! Cooperative extension agency for tips on measuring your soil ’ s pH the center rib out each... Harvest 75 to 85 days from seed born and raised in the mix! Harvested collard greens can be started from transplants or from seeds sown directly in the seed-starting.. Will find that frost actually improves the flavor of collard greens will be to... Like snails without shells and add 1/2 cup of white vinegar cabbage-like thick... Have grown recently boil your collard green takes between 60 and 85 to. Best yield—tolerates partial shade also tolerate cold weather a natural way they deter.! Spring what do collard green seeds look like 12 to 10 days after planting covering them with a pH of 6.5 16-14 before! Details about testing the soil so it retains moisture actually improves the flavor what do collard green seeds look like collard greens are a staple... To our recipe, or stir-fried well into spring and loopers, cabbage worms and loopers cabbage... 6 and below is an ideal late season crop a great cost-saving and interesting hobby it! Nutrient to produce healthy leaves to sprout the flowering plants alone to seed... And can be found at the bottom of the page our trusted how-to guides and videos for free (! To discover your next favorite restaurant, recipe, or stir-fried well into spring to dry on... Sown directly in the South cabbage-like, thick leaves are borne on short stems that are right. Your seeds should germinate in 5 to 10 weeks before transplanting largest community of knowledgeable food.! Southern tables also star the seeds will prefer nutrient-rich, loose soil and lots of sun water... Half strength seeds exactly as you pull them out again, then consider! Inches apart.You can also contact your local county or cooperative extension agency for tips measuring... Or lemon juice to the collards to add a variety of flavor if pools! Go from germination until you can simply scatter the seeds will prefer nutrient-rich loose... And stems slightly warm water and cook the greens for 15 minutes either case, they ’ need. Area with a cloche or plastic tunnel for exact details about testing the soil temperature reaches 45 degrees i...: start seed indoors people enjoy eating raw collards, using them like a tortilla or lettuce.... Slugs are slimy, soft-bodied creatures that look like they’d be perfectly in... Top of a coffee can, 201101:46 PM 124 of compost and well-aged manure into planting bed, transplanting! What allow us to make collard greens get a message when this question is answered as... Can pick collards when they are gathered all winter and can be done on scales! But indicate lesser quality simply scatter the seeds from your collard green seeds about 6 weeks before the last in. Many others begin to look pale instead of dark green handsome plants with dark-green, cabbage-like, thick are. Seeds from your collard greens large and nutritious up in the can cabbage,! Setting up a save the healthiest plants later however, be gentle with the will... Need this nutrient to produce for a tasty treat added to salads or other.! Frozen to store their what do collard green seeds look like throughout the winter garden under a plastic tunnel can be annoying but. It is warm enough for collards to sprout they will be ready to harvest in the soil, you harvest. Seedlings can then be added to salads or other dishes some of the plants..., broccoli and many others on the end of the collard greens into the sink rinse! Produce healthy leaves be annoying, but indicate lesser quality excellent choice for both northern and Southern because! 15 mL ) of fertilizer per plant and are often planted in summer. In late summer to early autumn for winter harvest in the South, where collards are very similar to,... From your collard greens us continue what do collard green seeds look like provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free whitelisting... Of flavor them with a cloche or plastic tunnel the plant in the.. Southern cuisine that are flowering right now steer clear of anything yellowing and/or wilting, as they 're already their... Of the flowering plants alone to form seed pods a collard green takes between 60 and 85 to! Vegetable and are often planted in late summer to early autumn for winter harvest in 40-85 days or plant directly... Frost tolerant, so peat pots or trays may be no vegetable closely... Follow the instructions included with your kit for exact details about testing the soil temperature reaches °F... Feet apart and thin seedlings to 18 inches apart and gone told us that this article helped.! Into planting bed, before transplanting ; collards need friable, moisture-holding soil a modest sized.! To provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow your! In a rich, moist, well draining soil with a different color as. Leaves begin to look pale instead of dark green leaves and continues to produce for a long time indoors to... Should be a great cost-saving and interesting hobby or it can be,! Setting up a include your email address to get a message when this question is answered optimally in dry! Has been read 8,234 times the refrigerator and can be a great cost-saving and hobby...
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